Building Regulations for External Windows and Doors

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Building regulations for external windows and doors in residential buildings ensure safety, energy efficiency, and overall performance. These regulations encompass various aspects, including structural integrity, thermal insulation, ventilation, and fire safety. Compliance with these standards helps maintain a safe and comfortable living environment while reducing energy consumption and enhancing the building’s sustainability.

The specific requirements are detailed in Schedule 1 of the Building Regulations, with each section supported by a statutory Approved Document,  providing practical guidance on the performance expected of materials and building work in order to meet the requirements of the Building Regulations 2010 for England.

Listed below are the Building Regulations Schedule 1 parts that contain the requirements for windows and doors in residential buildings:

  • Part B: Fire Safety
  • Part F: Ventilation
  • Part K: Protection from falling, collision and impact
  • Part L: Conservation of fuel and power
  • Part M: Access to and use of buildings
  • Part Q: Security

Part B – Fire Safety

Fire safety is a set of practices intended  to decrease the impact of fires on property and individuals. Part B of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 impose requirements for fire safety within and around buildings including residential homes, flats, residential accommodation, schools, colleges and offices.

Part B is supported with Approved Document B (ADB) that provides guidance on how to meet these requirements, including means of escape, fire spread, structural fire protection and fire service access.

 ADB consist of two parts:

  • Volume 1 covering dwellings (include residential homes, flats, blocks of flats etc.)
  • Volume 2 covering Buildings other than Dwellings (all other types of buildings covered by the building regulations like offices, schools, industrial buildings etc.)

The requirements for fire safety related to windows and external doors in dwellings are detailed in Volume 1, which provides guidance on the following questions:

  • Where to place the emergency escape windows and external doors,   
  • What is specifications for emergency escape windows and external doors.  

Find out more about fire safety requirements for windows and external doors in residential buildings in our latest blog post by following the link below:

Part F – Ventilation

Part L of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 imposes requirements for ventilation and indoor air quality for residential and commercial buildings.

Part L is supported with Approved Document L (ADL) that provides guidance on how to meet these requirements. Approved Document L is splitted in two separate volumes:

  • Volume 1: Dwellings
  • Volume 2: Buildings other than dwellings

Find out more about ventilation in residential buildings in our latest blog post by following the link below:

Part K- Protection from falling, collision and impact

Part L of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 covers all the aspects of building design and construction that protect people from falls, collisions, and impacts.

Part K is supported with Approved Document K which gives guidance on how to comply with the requirements from Part K.

Find out more about safety in glazing in residential buildings in our latest blog post by following the link below:

Part L – Conservation of fuel and power 

Conservative fuel and power in building refers to practices, technologies, and policies aimed at reducing energy consumption and enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. This includes using high-quality insulation materials, making all elements of the building fabric like walls, floors, roofs, windows and external doors more energy efficient, using HVAC systems,  maximising natural light and ventilation and more. These strategies will result in the development of more sustainable and eco-friendly buildings, ultimately lowering the carbon footprint of buildings.

Part L of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 imposes requirements for conservation of fuel and power for buildings including residential and commercial. Part L is supported with Approved Document L (ADL) that provides guidance on how to meet these requirements, including heat gains and losses, air permeability and pressure testing, thermal insulation, boiler productivity, lighting, and storage techniques for hot water.

Approved Document L is splitted in two separate volumes;

  • Volume 1: Dwellings
  • Volume 2: Buildings other than dwellings

The requirements for energy efficiency of external windows, rooflights and doors in dwellings are detailed in Volume 1, which provides guidance on the following issues:

  • Required U-values for external windows, rooflights and doors in new dwellings, existing dwellings and extensions, 
  • Required Window Energy Rating (WER) or Doorset Energy Rating (DER) for external windows, rooflights and doors in existing dwellings, 
  • The maximum glazing area, rule 25% of floor area, 
  • U-value calculation methods external windows and doors, 
  • SAP calculation for new buildings and over glazed extensions.

Find out more about energy efficiency of external doors, windows, and rooflights in residential buildings in our latest blog post by following the link below: 

Part Q – Security

Approved Document Q contains guidance on the requirement for security in new dwellings. Any window or door that could provide access into the building should conform to quality standards that will ensure they are sufficiently robust enough to withstand a breach attempt by an opportunity burglar.

All easily accessible doorsets that provide access to a dwelling should be secure doorsets. The secure doorsets should meet the security requirements of either;

  • PAS 24,
  • Other standards that provide similar or better performance,
  • In accordance with Appendix B (Bespoke timber doorsets) 

Ground floor, basement and other easily accessible windows (including easily accessible rooflights) should meet the security requirments of either; 

  • PAS 24 standard,
  • Other standards that provide similar or better performance,

Find out more about security of external doors and windows in new residential buildings in our latest blog post by following the link below: 

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